Reading Response #7

 Curriculum and Treaty Education

  1. What is the purpose of teaching Treaty Ed (specifically) or First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (FNMI) content and perspectives (generally) where there are few or no First Nations, Métis, or Inuit peoples?

The purpose of teaching Treaty Ed is to educate students on the process of the treaties made in Canada, the importance of the treaties, and who the treaties affect. It is important for all schools to learn about the treaties even if there are few or no First Nations, Métis, or Inuit peoples in the school. Treaties are important and a part of Canadian history that all students need to learn about. The purpose of Treaty Ed is to teach students what the treaties are and who played a role in the signing of the treaties. Treaty Ed teaches all of our students the rights that we have as treaty people. Responding to the student’s email I would encourage her to continue pushing for Treaty Education, and continue on teaching her students about the indigenous ways of knowing. I would encourage her to speak to other colleagues and get their opinions on what to do (how to teach this content). I would help her understand that this sort of content can be difficult to teach, but it is highly important for students to learn, to help them break the stereotypes that are placed on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples.

2. What does it mean for your understanding of curriculum that “we are all treaty people?”

After listening to Dwayne’s and Claire’s videos, and reading Cynthia’s narrative, I interpreted this quote as meaning that we all are living on treaty land. Each and every one of us is sharing treaty land. All of our ancestors played a part in the signing of the treaties. According to Champers; “The Treaties are a story that we share” (p.29). The treaties play a huge part in Canadian history. It is important to teach our students about the treaties as they affect each and every one of us. Responding to the student’s email, I would encourage her to teach her students that “we are all treaty people.” I would tell her to teach and help her students in understanding this concept. I would encourage her to plan lessons focused on the land that we share, and how treaties affect us.

It is important to include Treaty Ed in our classrooms, to help students understand the process of treaty signing, who was involved and how treaties affect everyone. In schools there will be people who may disagree with teaching Treaty Ed in the classroom, but it is part of the curriculum and treaties are a part of our country. As a future educator I will strive to teach Treaty Ed in my classrooms and make sure that my students learn about this content in a respectful manner (biases and stereotypes put aside; if they arise they will be dealt with in a professional manner).

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One thought on “Reading Response #7

  1. breannawatt4868 says:

    You have very good points in your blog. I’m happy to see a soon to be teacher seeing what needs to be done. How are you going to bring treaty education in your class, what will it look like?

    Like

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